Category Archives: Uncategorized

Ali ten Hove first time at CORK

(photo and story submitted by Ali ten Hove)

I grew up in the amazing sailing community of Kingston which provided me with the rich experience of world-class sailing right in my own backyard. CORK was the highlight event every summer that I would look forward to and watch with amazement as Kingston filled up with hundreds of sailors from across the country and from across the globe.

My first time racing in CORK was in 2008 sailing when I sailed in the Opti fleet. I was 12 years old and finished 69/98 boats. Given the strong southwesterlies, I was proud just to finish all the races! I continued to compete in CORK for many years, progressing through Optis, 420s and i420s before  graduating to the Olympic 49er FX class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyone who has ever sailed a skiff knows that it is an entirely different beast. If you let it, the boat will want to spend all of the time upside down! You are constantly focused on balancing the boat using your weight and adjusting the power in the sails. This takes some time to learn, and the first year of sailing the 49er is often referred to as ‘swimming lessons’. Big wipeouts and punishing bruises are an inevitable part of process.

(Ali and Mariah Millen in the 49erFX)

My first time racing the 49er FX was at CORK OCR in 2016. In true Kingston style, we were greeted with strong thermal winds and steep choppy waves! I think I lost count of how many times we flipped upside down. Undeterred, I am happy to report that we finished every race! Never giving up and battling to cross the finish line each and every time. There are some funny photos of our team out of control crossing the finish – always with a smile on our face. We ended up finishing the event in 5th place!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our team has continued to race in CORK OCR every year since. It continues to be one of our favourite events! CORK is a fun, safe and competitive event for sailors of all levels to come and test their skills. It’s always fun to think back to our first FX regatta as a team – getting dragged by our boat across the finish line! Never a dull moment sailing a 49er, especially in a big Kingston thermal!


(Ali and Mariah Millen with Danielle Boyd)

Wind Athletes Canada

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing your story with us Ali!

If you have story that you would like to share with others tag us in a story on social media or reach out to events@cork.org

We are looking forward to hearing from you!

The CORK Team

 

 

 

CORK website: www.cork.org

CORK Regatta Office: (613)-545-1322

Email: info@cork.org

Address: Portsmouth Olympic Harbour 53 Yonge Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CORKSailKingston

Twitter: www.twitter.com/corkkingston

Instagram: www.instagram.com/corkkingston

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Rheaume first time at CORK

 

 

 

 

 

(photo and story submitted by Martin Rheaume)

My first time at CORK was quite an eye opener as I had only 4 years experience as a sailor. I came to CORK in 2003 with 5 others members of SailRA (now merged with Ottawa New Edinburgh Club), for the International Albacore Championship. My crew (Bertrand Renaud) and I were there with AL7887. While the first races occurred in light winds, the conditions became more challenging… and this is where three memories stand out. On one start, we were in a very good position just beside the red hull Mega Wolf. While our speed and heading were similar to the other boat, we soon started being pushed sideways…. While I do not shy from sailing in heavy winds, it did not prepare me for important of properly managing waves….. as we do not have much of them on the Ottawa River. On the subsequent day, we were beating to the windward mark and needed to tack. I gave the command, my crew responded and initiated the manoeuvre. For a reason or another I was looking down through the manoeuver. I tacked and when I finally look up, my crew was no longer in the boat ! I look around and saw a few fingers on the port gunwale…. I put the boat in irons and help come aboard. When we tacked, his feet missed the hacking strap and he silently did a backflip in the water with no harm done. The last day was the most challenging race. On the last leg, running toward the finishing line, the boat started to roll from side to side and we capsized. Seven times we brought the boat back up and each time it capsized again. Two members which was not sailing due to the windy conditions and volunteer to be one safety boat, came around to help. Being exhausted, we decided that I would go in the rescue boat and one of them would take my place and jump in the water. They were able to finally bring the boat upright and started to sail toward the harbour. Suddenly the rudder line snaped and the boat once again capsized. After one more recovery, everyone was safe and sound in the harbour. When I came to CORK, I had two objectives: Have fun and not finish last in the regatta. It was a success all the way !

Ever since that first time I fell in love with CORK coming back to volunteer on Race Committees, Safety Boats and as a Judges, leaving the racing to younger and more experience sailors !

Thank you for sharing your story with us Martin!

If you have story that you would like to share with others tag us in a story on social media or reach out to events@cork.org

We are looking forward to hearing from you!

The CORK Team

 

 

 

CORK website: www.cork.org

CORK Regatta Office: (613)-545-1322

Email: info@cork.org

Address: Portsmouth Olympic Harbour 53 Yonge Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CORKSailKingston

Twitter: www.twitter.com/corkkingston

Instagram: www.instagram.com/corkkingston

Gary Jobson-First time at CORK

 

 

(photo and story submitted by Gary Jobson)

(photo from 1971.  I am standing behind my Finn with all the weight jackets I used to wear)

 

 

 

 

In 1971, at the age of 21, I drove my 1965 Pontiac with a borrowed Finn on a trailer to Kingston, Ontario for the new Canadian Olympic Regatta at Kingston.   It was a big deal.  We had about 40 Finns, maybe a few more.  All the big names were there. During one particularly breezy race about 15 Finns were approaching the leeward turning mark.  I was just behind the pack.  The waves were big and we were all surfing down the steep waves.   The battle for the inside position was intense.  Being behind the group I got to watch the scrum.   I was setting up to round behind the pinwheel of Finns.  The inside boat did a great job getting into position.  But, the sailor while rounding, forgot to put his centerboard down.   He slid sideways into the boat to leeward and that set off a domino effect with 15 Finns all banging into one another.  For me, trailing the mess about four boat lengths behind, I simply rounded right next to the turning mark and went from 16th (or so) into the lead.   Now, 49 years later I still smile about that moment.

Gary Jobson

 

 

 

(Jobson sailing a Laser in 1972)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Jobson steering Tenacious in 1979 Fastnet Race)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Modern day Gary smiling and sailing his current boat,  a Hood 32 (NO WEIGHT JACKETS!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing your story with us Gary!

If you have story that you would like to share with others tag us in a story on social media or reach out to events@cork.org

We are looking forward to hearing from you!

The CORK Team

 

 

 

CORK website: www.cork.org

CORK Regatta Office: (613)-545-1322

Email: info@cork.org

Address: Portsmouth Olympic Harbour 53 Yonge Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CORKSailKingston

Twitter: www.twitter.com/corkkingston

Instagram: www.instagram.com/corkkingston

 

 

 

Robert Vagners-First time at CORK, CORK Fall Regatta 2012

(story and photo submitted by Robert Vagners)

I volunteered to be the parent, chaperone and driver for 4 new sailors from QCYC participating in their first Fall CORK in 2012. It was also my first as a volunteer.

The drive to Kingston from Toronto was uneventful, pulling a trailered 420 with out a license plate. I was awestruck at how quickly the grass filled with sailboats from all across North America with sailors of all ages.

The learning opportunities, camaraderie and friendships between all of us volunteers on the water made the weekend fun and inspiring.

Watching the Albacores slice thru waves created by 27 knot winds was beautiful and watching my son and his crew float across the finish line hanging on to their 420 is etched in my mind ( photo attached of how it happened ).

 

 

 

They commented that going back to the usual 0-5 knots was going to be difficult.

I truly hope that Portsmouth Olympic Harbour and CORK will continue for generations to come, it is a valuable asset to our sailing community.

Wishing you well during this crazy time,

Robert

 

Thank you for sharing your story with us Robert!

If you have story that you would like to share with others tag us in a story on social media or reach out to events@cork.org

We are looking forward to hearing from you!

The CORK Team

 

 

 

CORK website: www.cork.org

CORK Regatta Office: (613)-545-1322

Email: info@cork.org

Address: Portsmouth Olympic Harbour 53 Yonge Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CORKSailKingston

Twitter: www.twitter.com/corkkingston

Instagram: www.instagram.com/corkkingston

Robert Woodbury-First time at CORK

 

(photos and story submitted by Robert Woodbury)

I first attended CORK as an athlete in the OK Dinghy class in 1971. Jim Beckett sailed in that fleet as well if I remember correctly.  There were 56 boats (I might have these numbers a bit wrong). Four did not compete in the series, so there were 52 actual boats. I finished 51st. The Kingston Whig Standard did an article on me entitled “This is the story of a loser.” No kidding!  Two years later, in the OK’s last appearance at CORK, we had only 18 boats. I finished second. First was Clive Roberts, then world champion. Third was Tony Rose, then youth champion.

I have no photos of those long-ago days, but do have some around the 1980 Olympics.

 

Robert went on to be the top Canadian Finn athlete set to represent Canada at the 1980 Olympics.   Now he is
National Race Officer & dedicated CORK volunteer!

 

(The heavy weather photo is the Finn Gold Cup 1980.)

 

 

 

 

The fleet one (I’m in the lead) is the 1980 USA Nationals in Los Angeles.

 

 

 

Robert with the CORK volunteer team at the 2019 CORK International Optimist Regatta (Robert is holding the flag on the left with Tim Irwin holding the flag on the right )

 

 

 

 

Robert giving out the prizes in his role as the Race Officer of the Optimist Championship fleet at the 2019 CORK International Optimist Regatta

 

 

 

Robert at Portsmouth Olympic Harbour with Tim Irwin and Ann Rouget

 

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing your story with us Robert!

If you have story that you would like to share with others tag us in a story on social media or reach out to events@cork.org

We are looking forward to hearing from you!

The CORK Team

 

 

 

CORK website: www.cork.org

CORK Regatta Office: (613)-545-1322

Email: info@cork.org

Address: Portsmouth Olympic Harbour 53 Yonge Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CORKSailKingston

Twitter: www.twitter.com/corkkingston

Instagram: www.instagram.com/corkkingston